Wednesday, May 13, 2009

What other people are saying

Cheryl Lynn of Digital Femme has a great article on Racialicious about black fantasy as communicated in comics, specifically the portrayal of the black African character Storm in the X-Men series:
 
Beauty is perhaps the most notable of Storm's attributes. After all, her birth name, Ororo, is said within the pages of X-Men to mean beauty in Swahili (instead of Uzuri, the actual Swahili word for beauty). Her stunning features are often remarked upon by other characters that come into contact with her. Her eyes are of the bluest hue. Her white locks are pin straight and luxurious. Truly, hers is the epitome of the "good hair" that our media proclaims all black women should desire and strive for. Read more...
 
Also on Racialicious, atlasien discusses "Geisha and Whores" in a searing essay:

But a lot of people, especially white people, are invested in defending geisha, in putting them on a pedestal. And when they do that, it does harm to Japanese-American women and to all Asian-American women. Appropriation is almost too mild of a word. It's not just theft, it's domination. Imagine a young girl, on the verge of understanding herself as a sexual being, looking deeply in the mirror… and seeing her mirror image controlled by puppet masters.

I'll try to explain further. The geisha figure is one end of a continuum of stereotypes of Asian woman sexuality. The continuum is inanimate. Other races have different sexual stereotypes: for example, "animalistic". But Asian women are neither animal nor human. They're inanimate things. They're so passive that they barely even move. On the high end, they're beautiful clockwork dolls, to be petted and treasured and collected and shown off. The most expensive ones can't even be bought for money; instead, you have to win them through your superior knowledge of authentic Asian culture. On the low end, they're doormats, sperm receptacles, happy ending massage girls, completely impersonal and interchangeable, existing for nothing more than a moment's pleasure. Common sex jokes about Asian women concentrate on the idea that they have "stripped down" bodies — neat, efficient, even machine-like — and facial features that lack human expression. Read more...

Los Angelista says "Look, my 'fro is not a fad!"

The other thing that helps is to realize that nothing, no magic product, is going to make my hair flatter or more "appropriate". It's big hair! There's no way around that, and I feel sorry for the people who are so afraid of my hair, think it's unprofessional, or think it's not fly.

And there are definitely those in my life who could do without my afro! There are folks who I'm sure would be quick to point out that they've never technically said they hate my hair.... to which I'd reply that you don't have to say it explicitly for me to know. Sometimes what's not said, never hearing that it's beautiful or looks nice, conveys the same message.

Does that bother me? Not anymore. With all that's going on in the world, with all the pressures of being a black women in this country, at this point in my life, the last thing I'm going to be stressed about is anybody who still thinks that long, straight hair is what's best for me. Yes, straight hair looked pretty on me, but I think this looks better. Read more...

The Daddy reminds us not to forget PFC LaVena Johnson:

Listen up. The Daddy is still feeling the case of PFC LaVena Johnson, a beautiful and smart black woman from a fine family. She was a high school honor student who played the violin and participated in volunteer efforts in her community. She could have been your daughter, If she had been, you would have been very, very proud. And you would have been very proud when she told you that she wanted to join the army to serve her country. But while serving her country, she was attacked and killed, and possibly raped, by someone in her own ranks. And as if that's not bad enough, the top military brass did everything it could to hide what happened to her family. Remember: this is about more than PFC Johnson. It's about gender-based violence against women by men who are supposed to have the women's back, to guard a fellow soldier's life as they would guard their own life. Read more...

 

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...